• isaandwsf isaprogram

last modified January 29 by facilitfsm


https://isaconf.confex.com/isaconf/forum2020/webprogrampreliminary/programs.html

 

RC10

https://isaconf.confex.com/isaconf/forum2020/webprogrampreliminary/Symposium576.html

 

RC26

https://isaconf.confex.com/isaconf/forum2020/webprogrampreliminary/Symposium592.html

 

both RC have a chapter  on the future of social forum 

https://isaconf.confex.com/isaconf/forum2020/webprogrampreliminary/Session15033.html

 

The Future of the World Social Forum

Abstract Submissions Closed

Wednesday, 15 July 2020: 14:15-15:45
Location: Auditorium F (Building 41)

RC10 Participation, Organizational Democracy and Self-Management (host committee)
RC26 Sociotechnics, Sociological Practice

Language: Spanish and English

Session Type: Oral


Since the beginning of the @WSF as an alternative gathering of civil society (focused on the common good) to the WEF in Davos (focused on the neoliberal project of capitalist globalization), there was a tension between two visions on how to proceed: One advocating an "Open Space" and the other a more "organizational and movement of movements approach." This tension has not yet been resolved and the internal debate has become virulent. Thus, the WSF process which is more needed than ever, given the current crisis of democracy and the return of fascism, is nowadays being threatened not only by ideological dispute but also by polarization and personal rivalries between key historical actors. The question up for discussion in this session deals with the future of the WSF as a vital alternative to neo-liberal globalization and neofascism, in the context of the world crisis of the 21st century: dramatic climate warming, environmental devastation due to extractivism, militarism, accelerated global inequality, a vast migratory crisis and humanitarian catastrophe, crisis of democracy, growing xenophobia, racism and neo-fascism, and other matters that impinge on: planetarian survival and the construction of other possible worlds, in the era of Anthropocene?

Session Organizers:
Azril BACAL ROIJ, Uppsala University, Sweden, bazril   gmail.com
Erik LINDHULT, Sweden, erik.lindhult     mdh.se

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https://isaconf.confex.com/isaconf/forum2020/webprogrampreliminary/Session15387.html 

Another World Is (still) Possible: 20 Years of @World Social Forum and the Future of Global Movements

Abstract Submissions Closed

Friday, 17 July 2020: 17:45-19:45
Location: Auditorium A (Building 41)

Language: English and Spanish

Session Type: Oral

Invited Session


In January 2001, the city of Porto Alegre hosted the first @World Social Forum. The meeting
was thought as a counterweight to the World Economic Forum and neoliberal globalization
and it implemented the slogan of the Via Campesina: “Globalize the Struggle, Globalize the
Hope”. The Forum gathered four times in Porto Alegre (2001, 2002, 2003, 2005), the latest
edition gathering over 170.000 people from 132 countries, with the slogan “Another world is
possible”. Its latest meeting took place in Bahia in 2018. Two decades later, the city hosts the
ISA Forum of Sociology in a very different context, far from the hope of global justice,
tolerance and deep democracy raised by the World Social Forum. This panel will be the opportunity to gather balances from the World Social Forum process over two decades, to analyze its success, its limits, its internal debate, its difficulties to connect with the 2010s major movements and its contributions to the building of a global movement in the 21st century. 

Common Session endorsed by RC44 Labor Movements, RC47 Social Classes and Social Movements, RC48 Social Movements, Collective Action and Social Change

Session Organizer:

Sabrina ZAJAK, Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany, sabrina.zajak@rub.de 

 

https://isaconf.confex.com/isaconf/forum2020/webprogrampreliminary/Session15179.html

The Challenges of Democratic Political Agency in Social Movements Today

Abstract Submissions Closed

Wednesday, 15 July 2020: 09:00-10:30
Location: 213 (Building 50)

RC48 Social Movements, Collective Actions and Social Change (host committee)

Language: English

Session Type: Oral


The growing social inequality created by neoliberalism is still being challenged by social movements that are critical of the new forms of hyper aggressive global capitalism. In this context social justice movements, which in the past have tried to create open, democratic spaces, and more horizontal forms of leadership and autonomy apart from the state and the institutions of global capitalism, continue to prefiguratively respond to the narrowing of democracy under neoliberalism. With this context as a backdrop this panel session seeks to explore multi-dimensional issues of political agency - and its contradictions and challenges - in progressive social movements from the @World Social Forum to Momentum in the UK, Aufstehen in Germany, En Comu in Barcleona and DiEM25 in the EU, and the grassroots, decentralized protests in Brazil. In doing so the panel tries to assess where movements are: 1) strategically as they engage in debates about whether to remain autonomous from states and parties, 2) as some launch insurgencies into, or create loose alliances with, existing parties (UK, US, Germany). How are movements dealing with neoliberal state power in the current historical conjuncture? The panel also seeks to explore the social-psychological dimensions and dynamics of movement organization and struggles, asking how participants are changed or transformed as they engage in struggles to keep open spaces open. How can 'new cultures of participation' be sustained in the current historical conjuncture? What are the challenges facing democratic movements today compared with the World Social Forum in the early 2000s?
Session Organizer:
Terry MALEY, York University, Canada, maley@yorku.ca

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https://isaconf.confex.com/isaconf/forum2020/webprogrampreliminary/Session14225.html

Democratic Experiments in Social Movements and Society

Abstract Submissions Closed

Friday, 17 July 2020: 09:00-10:30
Location: 213 (Building 50)

RC48 Social Movements, Collective Actions and Social Change (host committee)

Language: English

Session Type: Oral


Social movements and the spaces in which they organize have been studied as laboratories or schools of democracy. Porto Alegre hosted at least two important laboratories of democracy: Participatory budgeting and the @World Social Forum. Participatory budgeting was meant to increase the participation of ordinary citizens in the local political system and to increase the accountability of politicians and state officials. The World Social Forum can be considered as an attempt to bring some form of participatory democracy to the transnational level. Some see it as a significant step towards democratizing globalization others see it as a highly ambivalent and fragile process. In general, scholars tend to highlight the democratic idealism in social movements. At the same time, research shows that activists often fail to turn their ideals into reality because power imbalances are not sufficiently addressed.

This session invites submissions on the following or related issues:

  • What are the contemporary experiments in democratic organizing in social movements?

  • How does the same/similar democratic experiment such as participatory budgeting work out in different cultural, political and socio-economic contexts around the world?

  • How do democratic experiments affect the participants’ self-understanding as political subjects, how do participants engage with it and what are the barriers of effectively participating in it?

  • Is democracy (only) an organizational problem or an issue of clashing cultural and political norms?

  • How do organizers of (transnational) activist meetings (fail to) reconcile different political cultures and expectations of democratic organizing?

Session Organizer:
Micha FIEDLSCHUSTER, Leibniz Science Campus "Eastern Europe - Global Area", Germany, fiedlschuster@uni-leipzig.de

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https://isaconf.confex.com/isaconf/forum2020/webprogrampreliminary/Session13596.html

 From Subjectivity to Mobilization: A Critical View

Abstract Submissions Closed

Friday, 17 July 2020: 10:45-12:15
Location: 213 (Building 50)

RC48 Social Movements, Collective Actions and Social Change (host committee)

Language: English

Session Type: Oral


The 21st century was marked by a number of progressive social movements, the Zapatista movements anti-globalization movements first evident in Seattle,. At about this time the @World Social Forum emerged as a meeting place for thousands of progressive organizations, movements, NGOs and I NGOs, that could exchange ideas and establish networks for a diverse number of struggles, anti-globalization, peasant struggles, opposition to privatization of resources and services, feminism, gay rights, animal rights, ecology, etc. While the WSF was not a political movement per se, it nevertheless set the tone for a number of progressive mobilizations, collectively known as Arab Spring, Southern Europe and Occupyhad been ascendant against neoliberal capitalism. But that was not to be- indeed, there were a number of right wing mobilizations and/or shifts of political parties, to the right has seen a number of European countries, Holland, Austria, Hungary, England, Germany, Italy, and especially significant, the election of Donald Trump. How can we understand these movements? Many movements scholars, have argued that many contemporary social movements were precipitated by if not indeed caused by political economic factors as well as the arousal of intense, affects and emotions, perhaps precipitated by political economic factors, became the moving forces. The Spanish Indignados reminded us, many of occupations, were more likely “mobilizations for dignity.” Analyses of right wing movements, suggested that fears, anxieties, anger and ressentiment at the potential erosion if not extinction of white, male and often Christian identities -fostered right populisms, authoritarian nationalisms, and indeed, neo fascisms.

Session Organizers:
Lauren LANGMAN, Loyola University of Chicago, USA, llang944@aol.com,
Ben MANSKI, University of California Santa Barbara, USA, ben@ucsb.edu
Tova BENSKI, College of Management Studies, Israel, tovabenski@gmail.com